Working with the K’ómoks Nation towards Q’waq’wala7owkw on their unceded territory.

Working with the K’ómoks Nation towards Q’waq’wala7owkw on their unceded territory.

Kelp Restoration at Maude Reef

Here is a video of some of the kelp restoration work Project Watershed has been doing with Hornby Island Diving around Maude Reef off Hornby Island in British Columbia. You can see the lines we have seeded and how we have been excluding sea urchins to give the kelp a chance to get started. There is over 3,000 kilos of kelp growing in this area now. Thanks to Russell and Trisha of Seaproof.tv for the footage.

Background Information
Kelp beds are marine sanctuaries, providing some of the most productive ecosystems on the planet and serving as critical habitat and refuge for many species. The large, majestic algal species, Nereocystis luetkeana, dominates many kelp forests in coastal waters of southern B.C. However, losses of bull kelp have been reported from various community based groups. Increases in stressors associated with climate change (eg. rising ocean temperatures) are thought to be a major contributor to kelp declines. Thus, their survival will depend on the ability of existing populations to either withstand or adapt to these stressors. (Information from the Restoration Research on Kelp Forest Habitat in the Salish Sea poster created by Braeden Schiltroth, Sherryl Bisgrove, and Bill Heath)

To learn more about our kelp restoration visit our Kelp Information page. Kelp is a blue carbon plant to learn more visit our Blue Carbon page.

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