Working with the K’ómoks Nation towards Q’waq’wala7owkw on their unceded territory.

Working with the K’ómoks Nation towards Q’waq’wala7owkw on their unceded territory.

View form the Courtenay Airpark 34 by Bev Byerley

View from the Courtenay Airpark #34

About the Artwork

Medium: Acrylic on Canvas
Original Size: 36×24

Print Size:

11″ x 17″ Poster ~ for a donation of $25 or more.

11×15 Sold Out

36″x24″ on canvas ~ for a donation of $1000 or more.

$100 prints out of stock

Donate and Choose your Artwork

About the Artist

Born in Gimli, Manitoba, painter, printmaker Bev Byerley became a resident of the Comox Valley when her father was transferred to C.F.B. Comox in 1965.

Bev’s parents recognized her artistic talent at a very early age and at 8 years old they enrolled her in an adult painting class. After graduating from high school in 1977, Bev furthered her studies in an oil painting course at the Banff School of Fine Arts in Alberta.

Bev is perhaps best known in the Comox Valley for her acrylic landscapes of the west coast and of Newfoundland. Her commitment to her individuality through the years has resulted in Bev developing a style uniquely her own. Her love of the land is evident through the images she projects onto paper and speak of a knowledge of her subjects at a grass roots level. In her application of the paint, images and colours are shaped with an impressionistic influence capturing the essence of the subject in flowing line and colour while also displaying a strong sense of design and balance.

Find out more

www.bevbyerley.com

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