Working with the K’ómoks Nation towards Q’waq’wala7owkw on their unceded territory.

Working with the K’ómoks Nation towards Q’waq’wala7owkw on their unceded territory.

Our Blue Carbon Initiative

Blue Carbon
Project Watershed in cooperation with the The Estuary Working Group is doing research to learn more about how salt marsh and eelgrass beds in our local Estuary contribute to the uptake and storage of carbon from the atmosphere.

We are also planting eelgrass and restoration salt marsh as part of this Blue Carbon initiative. We started eelgrass planting in 2010 – we did a small pilot project north of the Royston Wrecks and planted 300 shoots with divers and shore volunteers. Recent surveys show that this planting has been a major success with more than a 300% increase in plants! Since then we have done many other plantings including a project with the Department of Defense where we planted over 2400 shoots! 2014 was the first year we did salt marsh plantings. We started with a pilot project to plant 300 square meters also in the Royston Wreck area. Salt marsh planting is a little more complicated than eelgrass planting. One reason is that many of the salt marsh areas have been inundated with Spartina patens an invasive species that we will need to remove and replace with native species.

Human Resources

Related Posts

Spring Field Trips

Throughout May and June Project Watershed will be taking elementary school classes out on field trips to learn about estuary and coastal ecology and to assist with planting and plant maintenance.

Climate Change and Kus-kus-sum by WWF

This video, produced by the World Wildlife Fund, explores the connection between Kus-kus-sum and climate change. One of the benefits of restoring 8.3 acres of habitat at Kus-kus-sum is all the plants that are being planted will take up carbon, helping mitigate climate change.