Working with the K’ómoks Nation towards Q’waq’wala7owkw on their unceded territory.

Working with the K’ómoks Nation towards Q’waq’wala7owkw on their unceded territory.

Citizen-Science Saltmarsh and Eelgrass Monitoring Program

saltmarsh and eelgrass monitoring program
The monitoring program provides volunteers and community groups with all the information, materials and support necessary to help us monitor our restoration projects.

Monitoring is a critical step in understanding the success of our restoration efforts. Stay tuned to our website for news about upcoming monitoring training opportunities.

Later this month we will be planting subtidal eelgrass at Miracle Beach. We will be looking for volunteers to help bundle and tie in the eelgrass in preparation for planting by SCUBA divers. A volunteer sign-up form will be available soon.

The Coastal Restoration Team has also been busy planning a salt marsh restoration project in the Fanny Bay area that will be happening later summer. Stay tuned for updates on this project!

If you have any questions about this project, please email 
estuary.projectwatershed@gmail.com

Human Resources

Related Posts

Coastal Restoration Update August 2020

Nikki Wright from Seachange Marine Conservation Society and Maria Cantazaro from the Pacific Salmon Foundation (PSF) visited our kelp research site at Oyster River and our saltmarsh projects. Maria is a researcher working for the PSF on a report looking at the importance of nearshore, habitat connectivity and estuarine habitat to Pacific salmon.

Coastline Restoration in Fanny Bay

On June 17-19, 2020 Project Watershed organized a planting session to restore the vulnerable coastline in the Fanny Bay area. During the three days, our staff and 19 volunteers helped plant almost 2500 individual plants, comprised of Salicornia, Distichilis and dune grass species. This planting compliments another coastal restoration project where the shoreline was revegetated to protect the area from erosion.

Kus-kus-sum Helps Tackle Climate Change – Unpave Paradise

A variety of native plants, shrubs and trees will be established at Kus-kus-sum as part of the restoration process. This will not only provide food, shelter and habitat for fish and wildlife but also help mitigate climate change. Check out this video to find out more.

Kus-kus-sum Supports the Salish Sea – Unpave Paradise

Project Watershed’s Kus-kus-sum project is important for supporting the broader Salish Sea Ecosystem. The project will restore habitat for fish and wildlife, attenuate flooding, and create habitat connectivity to adjacent conservation lands in the estuary. Kus-kus-sum provides habitat for mobile species, such as salmon, that utilize the broader Salish Sea ecosystem in their lives.

Kus-kus-sum Morphing Video

Project Watershed worked with local artist Robert Lundquist to create this video which outlines how nature will be restored at Kus-kus-sum.