Working with the K’ómoks Nation towards Q’waq’wala7owkw on their unceded territory.

Working with the K’ómoks Nation towards Q’waq’wala7owkw on their unceded territory.

Kelp Forests

R.Zielinski-Juvenile-fish-in-Kelp
A kelp forest is a type of nearshore vegetative habitat, found along rocky coasts with wave action or strong currents in depths of 4 to 20 metres.

In the Salish Sea the bull kelp (Nereocystis luetkeana) forms a floating canopy layer, while the broad blade Laminarian kelp provides an understory layer, not readily visible from the water surface.  These kelp forests provide refuge for juvenile salmon and associated feed organisms.

Kelp forests are in noticeable decline in the Salish Sea in recent years. Water temperatures exceeding 18⁰C during summer months and intensive grazing pressure from sea urchins are believed to be the cause.

Human Resources

Related Posts

Soil Contamination at Kus-kus-sum

The Kus-kus-sum project aims to unpave and restore an industrial sawmill site to natural habitat on the banks of an important fish bearing stream in the Comox Valley. As milling took place on the site for about 60 years there is a concern that it is contaminated with chemicals associated with the sawmill industry. In addition to this, the site was filled with a variety of materials (tires, beds etc…) to raise and level the area for sawmill operations.

Coastline Restoration in Fanny Bay

On June 17-19, 2020 Project Watershed organized a planting session to restore the vulnerable coastline in the Fanny Bay area. During the three days, our staff and 19 volunteers helped plant almost 2500 individual plants, comprised of Salicornia, Distichilis and dune grass species. This planting compliments another coastal restoration project where the shoreline was revegetated to protect the area from erosion.

Kus-kus-sum Helps Tackle Climate Change – Unpave Paradise

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Kus-kus-sum Supports the Salish Sea – Unpave Paradise

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Kus-kus-sum Morphing Video

Project Watershed worked with local artist Robert Lundquist to create this video which outlines how nature will be restored at Kus-kus-sum.