Working with the K’ómoks Nation towards Q’waq’wala7owkw on their unceded territory.

Working with the K’ómoks Nation towards Q’waq’wala7owkw on their unceded territory.

Restoring Kelp Forest Habitat

Comox Valley Project Watershed Society is working with partners to restore kelp forests using two methods: planting seeded kelp lines and reducing grazing pressure by sea urchins.

The study sites are at Maude Reef (grid and outer sites; Hornby Island) and Cape Lazo shoal, with a reference site at Eagle Rock on SE Denman Island.

Seeded Kelp Lines

Lines seeded with young bull kelp are deployed to facilitate natural recruitment of bull kelp in the surrounding area.  As these kelps grow, they will release sori (reproductive structures) into the seawater.

Reducing Urchin Grazing

To determine if grazing by sea urchins is negatively affecting kelp abundance in the area, urchin exclusion cages were deployed on the ocean floor. This will allow study of kelp recovery when sea urchin grazing is controlled.

Human Resources

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Spring Field Trips

Throughout May and June Project Watershed will be taking elementary school classes out on field trips to learn about estuary and coastal ecology and to assist with planting and plant maintenance.

Climate Change and Kus-kus-sum by WWF

This video, produced by the World Wildlife Fund, explores the connection between Kus-kus-sum and climate change. One of the benefits of restoring 8.3 acres of habitat at Kus-kus-sum is all the plants that are being planted will take up carbon, helping mitigate climate change.