Working with the K’ómoks Nation towards Q’waq’wala7owkw on their unceded territory.

Working with the K’ómoks Nation towards Q’waq’wala7owkw on their unceded territory.

Historic Earth Day 2020

Earth Day 2020
This year is the 50th anniversary of Earth Day. It started in 1970 amid Vietnam war protests and scary, diverse and numerous environmental issues in the USA. As the environmental movement grew, so did the general public’s desire for change. Earth Day was first celebrated in Canada by a small yet influential group in 1990, leading to the establishment of Earth Day Canada (EDC), a national environmental charity which overlooks Earth Day events and supports Canadians in celebrating the largest environmental event worldwide across 196 countries.

We at Project Watershed wanted to hold an event at Kus-kus-sum this week to celebrate Earth Day, but obviously that is not possible with the current pandemic situation. We do feel that the story of the Kus-kus-sum project provides an uplifting alternative to the doom and gloom. 

Recently Tim Ennis, Kus-kus-sum Senior Project Manager stated that “the importance of natural areas which are accessible to broad sectors of society and embedded within local communities has taken on a pronounced importance not previously recognized. Particularly in relation to mental health in this time of social distancing with Covid-19”.

Tim Ennis went on to say, “Many of the natural areas within the Comox Valley are not National Parks, Provincial Parks or the like. They are beaches, small creek-side areas, swamps and wetlands that were protected by local non-profits working in partnership with local governments.  They are the places where frogs sing, skunk cabbage blooms, and people find solace in these stressful times. Our Kus-kus-sum project fits that description to a T while also supporting biodiversity at the regional, national and continental-scales so it is a great time to be thinking about it!”

Project Watershed has been pleased with the donations towards the final land payment following the recent CBC Radio coverage, however, we still need about $650,000 by the end of June. Fortunately, our Estuary Angel has stepped forward and will be matching donations up to $30,000. So for this Earth Day instead of coming to an event we are hoping you celebrate Earth Day at home, perhaps using the suggestions below, and make a donation large or small to Kus-kus-sum. We still have a few wooden salmon left if you want to sponsor one to go up on the Kus-kus-sum fence!

Here are some Earth Day links you can use to connect to nature, today and every day:

https://www.earthday.org/earth-day-2020/

https://www.almanac.com/content/earth-day-date-activities-history

Kathy Haigh

Fundraising and Outreach Chair, Project Watershed

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Climate Change and Kus-kus-sum by WWF

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