Working with the K’ómoks Nation towards Q’waq’wala7owkw on their unceded territory.

Working with the K’ómoks Nation towards Q’waq’wala7owkw on their unceded territory.

Kus-kus-sum Supporters Speak Up

This film highlights why people, businesses, schools etc... are supporting the Kus-kus-sum Project.

It was produced by Alisha Levesque as part of the Comox Art Gallery’s Youth Media Project.

Related Posts

Karate is helping unpave paradise at Kus-kus-sum

On June 30, the students and instructors of Toshikan Traditional Karate and Kobudo, in Courtenay, completed 108 kata (kata is a series of self-defence techniques combined in a traditional form) as fundraiser for the Kus-Kus-Sum project, in appreciation of Project Watershed’s good work for natural habitat of the valley and the estuary.

Kus-kus-sum Helps Tackle Climate Change – Unpave Paradise

A variety of native plants, shrubs and trees will be established at Kus-kus-sum as part of the restoration process. This will not only provide food, shelter and habitat for fish and wildlife but also help mitigate climate change. Check out this video to find out more.

Kus-kus-sum Supports the Salish Sea – Unpave Paradise

Project Watershed’s Kus-kus-sum project is important for supporting the broader Salish Sea Ecosystem. The project will restore habitat for fish and wildlife, attenuate flooding, and create habitat connectivity to adjacent conservation lands in the estuary. Kus-kus-sum provides habitat for mobile species, such as salmon, that utilize the broader Salish Sea ecosystem in their lives.

Kus-kus-sum highlighted as a “Project to Build a Better BC”

The B.C. government has set aside $1.5 billion for COVID-19 economic recovery. Dogwood BC recently surveyed supporters and allies to ask how that stimulus money should be spent in ways that will put people back to work, advance our climate goals and build stronger communities.

Kus-kus-sum Morphing Video

Project Watershed worked with local artist Robert Lundquist to create this video which outlines how nature will be restored at Kus-kus-sum.

Imagine Kus-kus-sum

This film gives a glimpse of what the old Field Sawmill site (Kus-kus-sum) could look like once it is transformed into nature.

CBC promotes Kus-kus-sum!

If you haven’t already seen it, CBC did a radio interview and a post about our Kus-kus-sum project. Thank you, CBC! We’d also like to acknowledge the importance of the collaboration of the City of Courtenay and K’ómoks First Nation in moving toward our vision for this spot!

COVID-19 won’t stop Kus-kus-sum

Some of you may be asking what effect COVID-19 will have on the Kus-kus-sum project. Even though we do not know the full extent of the effects of this pandemic, we remain committed to unpaving paradise at Kus-kus-sum and confident of success.