Working with the K’ómoks Nation towards Q’waq’wala7owkw on their unceded territory.

Working with the K’ómoks Nation towards Q’waq’wala7owkw on their unceded territory.

Karate is helping unpave paradise at Kus-kus-sum

Toshikan Traditional Karate and Kobudo

On June 30, the students and instructors of Toshikan Traditional Karate and Kobudo, in Courtenay, completed 108 kata (kata is a series of self-defence techniques combined in a traditional form) as fundraiser for the Kus-Kus-Sum project, in appreciation of Project Watershed’s good work for natural habitat of the valley and the estuary.

Toshikan owner and head instructor, Mac Newton, says that 108 is a special number in Eastern cultures and in karate. In some traditions, 108 is considered the number of completion. Following COVID-19 health requirements the kata were performed outside with physical distancing. In addition to a donation of $108 from the karate school itself, students and parents of students added donations to bring the total to $263. Thank you for helping unpave paradise Toshikan Traditional Karate and Kobudo. If you have a group that wants to throw or has thrown a fundraisier for Kus-kus-sum please contact info@kuskussum.ca so we can get pictures and post about it on our website. It may encourage other groups to do something similar!

Students doing the 108 kata for Kus-kus-sum

Find Toshikan Traditional Karate and Kobudo on Facebook.

Human Resources

Related Posts

Kus-kus-sum Fundraising Blitz

A three tiered fundraiser that includes a 50/50 raffle, online auction, and reverse telethon to raise funds to protect and restore Kus-kus-sum.

Cleanup Success at Kus-kus-sum and Hollyhock Flats

On Saturday, September 26, forty volunteers pitched in to collect garbage at Kus-kus-sum and Hollyhock Flats as part of the Great Canadian Shoreline Cleanup. The photos and short video captured from the day illustrate just how industrious it was.

Kus-kus-sum Fall Update and Letter Writing Appeal

Project Watershed has raised over $2.9 million for Kus-kus-sum and they are closer than ever to acquiring and restoring the site to natural habitat for fish & wildlife, climate change mitigation, reconciliation and community health.

The Uplifters Shop is lifting up Kus-kus-sum and Project Watershed

Deanne McRae and Mackenzie Gartside have started something new in downtown Courtenay – The Uplifters Shop. Unlike a normal for profit retail store, most of the items they sell have some kind of charity kickback. In this way the store “lifts up” a variety of charities both local and abroad. One project they are supporting is Project Watershed’s Kus-kus-sum initiative.

Glass Salmon for Kus-kus-sum

Christopher Smith of Glaskrafter Art Glass is generously donating the proceeds from a selection of his beautiful kiln cast glass salmon sculptures to the Kus-kus-sum project. In fact, he has already donated $1,600 to Kus-kus-sum for a sculpture bought in August.