Working with the K’ómoks Nation towards Q’waq’wala7owkw on their unceded territory.

Working with the K’ómoks Nation towards Q’waq’wala7owkw on their unceded territory.

Preparations Have Begun to Unpave Kus-kus-sum

Concrete to be removed from the Kus-kus-sum site this summer!

Kus-kus-sum by Kaylee Duckmanton Photography

Even though there isn’t much activity on the Kus-kus-sum site just yet, don’t be fooled. Behind the scenes, Project Watershed staff and volunteers are busy getting everything ready to start removing the hard surfacing, both concrete and asphalt on site this summer.

Project Watershed, in consultation with Northwest Hydraulic Consultants, has created a robust plan of action for the restoration of Kus-kus-sum which will include the removal of concrete, regrading and re-contouring the site, amending the soils, and replanting with native species, and eventually removing the steel piling wall. We are working to have a contractor ready to remove the concrete this summer. Thanks to biologist Caroline Heim, we also have a planting prescription for the native species to be planted once the site is ready. We are currently in communication with archaeologists and the K’ómoks First Nation to assess and monitor archaeological considerations on the site and have soil engineers in place to help assess and plan any substrate removal and disposal. We are also working with professionals to make a plan for baseline data collection and monitoring of the site and have enlisted a videographer to capture this exciting work. 

We will have another update you in a few weeks! 

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